Sonnets

A classic poetic form, consisting of fourteen lines of iambic pentameter. The two most usual rhyme schemes are ababcdcd-efefgg (English/Shakespearean) and abbaabba-cdecde or abbaabba-cdcdcd (Italian/Petrarchan). The move from the first eight lines (the octave) to the remaining six lines (the sestet) often sees a turn in the theme or the 'argument' of the poem. Dialectical, innit?

Sugar-Coated Sonnet

A sonnet written on the occasion of Lord Alan Sugar's resignation form the Labour Party:

So who invited that spiv to the party?
No, we don't want his cut-throat sort round here
His anti-social manners are so nasty
He's nicking all the food and selling beer
He's telling all my mates that they are fired
And acting like he bloody owns the place
His snotty, bossy, snobbery is tired
I'm losing friends who hate this public face
He came in with another party crasher
And now he's gone but not cleared up his rubble
He's got a better offer - somewhere flasher?
And now we're spared the need to take the trouble
- To turf Lord Cuckoo out of Labour's nest
- Which leaves the task of turfing out the rest

We, The Undersigned

I'm going to add my name to two petitions
My sense of right and justice is inflamed
I usually have no time for politicians
But those who keep their silence should be shamed
There comes a time to stand up and be counted
To put one's name to causes good and strong
Sometimes the moral high ground must be mounted
And bold lines clearly drawn twixt right and wrong

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