Trade unions

Workers' self-defence starts with getting unionised at work. This section includes material on the trade union struggles and issues I am involved in and/or urge you to support!

Speaking in Support of Tube Cleaners

TUC women cleaners 2020

Today at TUC Women's conference, PCS moved a motion congratulating their members at BEIS for successful strike action, and drawing attention to the appalling conditions that outsouced workers, many of them women, face. I made the following contribution to the debate.

Congratulations to PCS on its brilliant win at BEIS and solidarity with your ongoing sturggles at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and elsewhere.

Living with Monocular Vision

falsie

I wrote this for my employer's intranet Living With .. series written by disabled workers, and thought I'd share it here too.

What is monocular vision?

I only have sight in my left eye. Some people lose sight in one eye gradually, through illness or disease. My sight loss, though, was rather more sudden and dramatic.

My monocular vision

Mental health in call centres: Get unionised!

Mental health in call centres

Call centre working is a danger to your mental health

Depression, anxiety, panic attacks, high blood pressure, sleeping problems and even suicidal thoughts are common among call centre workers.

More than 4 in 5 respondents to a Unison survey said that work made them stressed.

In another survey [Mind], when asked how workplace stress affected them:

Flowers Beside the Line

RMT on Port Talbot

When workers leave their homes to graft
by muscle or by brain
The least they need is safety from
the dangers and the strain
So those who wave their loved ones off
can wave them home again

Flowers will lie beside the line
where working people fell
For those who keep our railways safe -
they must be safe as well

Speaking out about deaths in care

Speaker

Janine proposing a motion condemning deaths of autistic and learning disabled people in care, at TUC Disabled Workers' Conference in May 2019.

***

On 21 March this year, an inquest ruled that the death of Colette McCulloch was avoidable.

Colette was thirty-five years old when she died. She was autistic, and in a hostile society, she had become mentally unwell.

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