Work

Working nine-to-five, round-the-clock shifts, only when the boss wants you or not working at all ...

How workplaces can create difficulties for autistic workers

From the TUC handbook, Autism in the Workplace

Workplaces and employers make work difficult for autistic workers for the following reasons:

Discrimination: Treating the autistic worker differently from, less favourably than, others.

Bullying by management, including ridicule and physical/ verbal abuse.

Lack of communication and support.

Women in the Present

The second section of the Workers' Liberty pamphlet 'Comrades and Sisters' looks at women's situation today.

Domestic work, (badly-)paid work, the vast gulf between working-class and ruling-class women. Women in communities, and women in the welfare state. Religious fundamentalism, the state, New Labour and family values.

How can Marxism explain women's oppression?

Housework is Horrid

Speaking Out about Autism at Work

This is the speech I gave at TUC Disabled Workers' Conference 2013 in proposing RMT's resolution on Autism in the Workplace.

Andrew Beck has Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum condition. He was a golf club greenkeeper for 13 years with no problems, until a new boss bullied, humiliated and assaulted him, and forced him out of his job. Andrew won £78k at Employment Tribunal

'British Work for British Hands'

Seeing this Conservative candiddate's advert in a 1910 issue of the East London Advertiser, it struck me that the 'British jobs for British workers' slogan of a couple of years ago was neither new nor left-wing.

‘British work for British hands’
Not for scum from foreign lands
Tory slogan, nineteen ten,
How much has really changed since then?

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